Research Skills

Methodology tutorials

Because GSH PhD candidates may need to train very different and specific research skills, it is not feasible to include the broad variety of these skills in the GSH skills training programme. That is why The Graduate School has set up a system of small scale research tutorials under the supervision of faculty experts.

What is a tutorial?

Five or six participants can set up a tutorial group to train specialist skills they need for their research projects, e.g. quantitative analysis of corpus data, interview techniques, digital ethnography. Because of the small scale set-up, the tutorials will be highly interactive and because the PhD candidates themselves are involved in the programme, the expectation is that the tutorials will be an efficient way of sharing specialist knowledge and skills.

Tutorial meetings are organized in close collaboration with the tutors and the PhD candidates, the PhD candidates take the lead in organizing the meetings, but practical assistance, such as booking rooms, will be offered by the Graduate School. There are no set times and dates for the tutorials and they can take place whenever it suits the tutor and the PhD candidates involved. Each tutorial can have no more than 3 meetings.

Organization

If you want to organize (and take) a tutorial, please contact the coordinators of the Graduate School, Margreet Vermeulen or Eloe Kingma at phdskills-fgw@uva.nl. In principle they will ask you to draft a plan, hand in a list of participants, the name of the tutor, etc. But if you have just a plan, they can help you to realize it.

A tutorial can contribute a maximum of up to 1 ECTS [28 hours].

Finding FGw tutors

The names of prospective FGw tutors, together with the skills they are willing to share can be found on this form. For the rest of the academic year, these are the tutorials on offer, but please note that this is not a set list but one that will be updated regularly so that it will result in a comprehensive and useful overview of faculty expertise.

Published by  Graduate School of Humanities

30 July 2018